We’re over halfway through the first month of 2014. How are your New Year’s resolutions going? Still staying true to them? I’m not big on making New Year’s resolutions. I just think it’s unhelpful to put so much pressure on yourself at the beginning of a year, as if that’s the only time to accomplish anything meaningful. Don’t get me wrong: I’m not criticizing people who set goals and strive to improve themselves. I believe in setting goals; I just prefer to do it throughout the year.

If I did make New Year’s resolutions for self-improvement, like many people do, I’d have a wide variety of options to choose from. I’m sure there are many failures and flaws of which I am blissfully ignorant, but the ones I do know about really bother me. I want to improve. I want to do what is right and good, and stop doing what is wrong and bad. I’m sure most of us have that desire. That’s a good thing, right? Those of us who are Christians should be especially concerned about doing good and shunning evil.

But I wonder sometimes: Is that what Christianity is really about? Is this just a religion of self-improvement that helps me overcome my annoying flaws so I can feel a bit more self-satisfied? Is this all that Jesus came to do, to enable me to make New Year’s resolutions and set goals for being a better, nicer, fitter, smarter me?

Maybe there’s more to it than that. The Jesus I read about in the Bible is not concerned with correcting a few character flaws so that people can live reasonably at peace with themselves. He is deeply interested in bringing about total life transformation—a complete paradigm shift that changes the very core of our being. What’s more, He wants a deep personal relationship with us. He wants to be more than a life coach that we visit every now and then when we need a pep talk. He wants to be our best friend, someone we talk to all the time.

So now I’m thinking about my life, my desire to do what’s right, and my relationship with Jesus. I’m a perfectionist by nature, so this is a serious issue. Am I focused on correcting my flaws, instead of pursuing Jesus? What would satisfy me more: to know that I have ridded myself of one more annoying bad habit, or to know that I am daily living in the presence of a friend who loves me despite all of my flaws?

What if the secret to bettering ourselves is not found in trying harder and harder every year to be “good?” What if instead the secret is pursuing a deep friendship with a Man called God-with-us, and by beholding His perfection we ourselves become changed, and not just into the better version of ourselves that we envisioned, but into a perfect representation of His flawless character? Think about it. If you’re a perfectionist like me, would you rather be good, or be perfect?

Is it possible that sometimes we hate sin more than we love Jesus? That maybe for us Christianity is more about overcoming the bad habits that bother us than it is about a love relationship with Jesus? Maybe we appreciate Jesus as Savior because He promises to set us free from our enslavement to evil. But we struggle with Jesus as Lord because, honestly, we’d like to be set free to do our own thing—good things instead of bad things, yes, but still our own agenda, not His.

What we need are not more New Year’s resolutions to do bigger and better things. What we need is a New Year’s revolution: a complete transformation of our entire life that radically restructures our priorities. Jesus comes first, not me. Improving myself is not what’s most important; following Jesus is. And guess what: the great thing about following Jesus is that you will improve. In fact, you’ll have much more success than if you focus on making yourself better. The thing about sin is that it’s like a hydra: chop off one problem and three more grow out of it. We can waste an entire lifetime futilely chopping away at our sin problem, or we can spend a lifetime following Jesus and let Him kill the heart of the beast within us. It’s our choice.

My choice is to have a New Year’s revolution, not just in January, but in every month, week, day, hour, minute, and second of the year. I may not always be completely true to this goal, but thankfully I know Jesus will still love me anyway. That’s why I want to follow Him. I love Him because He first loved me. And as I follow Him, He will show me the way—not to accomplish my own agenda, but to fulfill His will.

“Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.” (Romans 12:2)

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